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dc.contributor.authorRum, Lorenzo
dc.contributor.authorLaudani, Luca
dc.contributor.authorVannozzi, Giuseppe
dc.contributor.authorMacaluso, Andrea
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T15:08:49Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T15:08:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-13
dc.identifier.citationRum, L., Laudani, L., Vannozzi, G. and Macaluso, A., 2018. 'Age-related changes in upper body contribution to braking forward locomotion in women', Gait & posture. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.11.015en_US
dc.identifier.issn0966-6362
dc.identifier.issn1879-2219
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10178
dc.descriptionArticle published in Gait & posture available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.11.015en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Gait termination is a transitory task that requires the lower body to produce braking forces and inhibit forward propulsion. However, it is still unknown whether the upper body plays an active role in braking of gait and whether this mechanism is impaired with ageing. Research question Do older women exhibit an impaired control of upper body segments during gait termination with respect to young women? Methods Ten young and 10 older women performed three gait termination trials at comfortable speed while fixing the gaze on a visual target. A 3D motion analysis system was used to measure head, trunk and pelvis angular displacement and velocity, and estimate neck, waist and hip moments through Plug-in Gait modeling. Cross-correlation analysis of kinematic waveforms between paired adjacent segments (head-trunk and trunk-pelvis) was performed to investigate upper body coordination. Surface EMG activity of erector spinae (L3), sternocleidomastoid and neck extensor muscles was recorded. Statistics was carried out by MANOVA. Results Older participants exhibited delayed peak extensor torques of neck, waist and hip compared to young participants, along with lower progression speed. Both groups showed a slight flexion of the trunk counteracted by a backward tilt of head and pelvis during braking. In addition, older women displayed a peculiar upper body coordination pattern, with the head coupling with trunk motion, as shown by cross-correlation. Older women displayed shorter lumbar erector spinae onset latency relative to last heel contact than young (16 ± 68 ms vs 92 ± 37 ms). Significance The upper body plays an active role in the braking of gait and this mechanism is impaired in older women. Moreover, the age-related coupling of head and trunk motion may produce an unbalancing effect on whole-body stability during the braking mechanism, thus leading to a higher risk of falls.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGait & Posture;
dc.subjectgait terminationen_US
dc.subjecthead stabilityen_US
dc.subjectelderlyen_US
dc.subjectupper bodyen_US
dc.subjectlocomotionen_US
dc.titleAge-related changes in upper body contribution to braking forward locomotion in womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.11.015
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-12
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-13
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2019-11-13
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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