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dc.contributor.authorGlaister, Mark
dc.contributor.authorTowey, Colin
dc.contributor.authorJeffries, Owen
dc.contributor.authorMuniz-Pumares, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Paul
dc.contributor.authorMcInnes, Gillian
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-30T10:01:52Z
dc.date.available2019-01-30T10:01:52Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-11
dc.identifier.citationGlaister, M., Towey, C., Jeffries, O., Muniz-Pumares, D., Foley, P. and McInnes, G. (2018) Caffeine and sprint cycling performance: effects of torque factor and sprint duration. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, pp.1-19. DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2018-0458.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1555-0273
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10247
dc.descriptionArticle published in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance on 11 September 2018 (online), available at: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2018-0458en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of torque factor and sprint duration on the effects of caffeine on sprint cycling performance. Methods: Using a counterbalanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 13 men completed nine trials. In Trial 1, participants completed a series of 6 s sprints at increasing torque factors, to determine the torque factor, for each individual, which elicited the highest (TOPTIMAL) peak power output (PPO). The remaining trials involved all combinations of torque factor (0.8 N∙m∙kg-1 versus TOPTIMAL), sprint duration (10 s versus 30 s), and supplementation (caffeine [5mg∙kg-1] versus placebo). Results: There was a significant effect of torque factor on PPO, with higher values at TOPTIMAL (mean difference: 168 W; 95% likely range: 142 – 195 W). There was also a significant effect of sprint duration on PPO, with higher values in 10 s sprints (mean difference: 52 W; 95% likely range: 18 – 86 W). However, there was no effect of supplementation on PPO (p = 0.056). Nevertheless, there was a significant torque factor × sprint duration × supplement interaction (p = 0.036), with post hoc tests revealing that caffeine produced a higher PPO (mean difference: 76 W; 95% likely range: 19 – 133 W) when the sprint duration was 10 s and the torque factor was TOPTIMAL. Conclusions: The results of this study show that when torque factor and sprint duration are optimized, to allow participants to express their highest PPO, there is a clear effect of caffeine on sprinting performance.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance;
dc.titleCaffeine and sprint cycling performance: effects of torque factor and sprint durationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2018-0458
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-08-28
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolitan (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01-28
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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