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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Ellen W.
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-05T09:53:07Z
dc.date.available2019-02-05T09:53:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-29
dc.identifier.citationEvans, E.W. and Redmond, E.C. (2019). ‘Laboratory re-enactment of storage practices of older adults to determine potential implications for growth of listeria monocytogenes’, Food Protection Trends, 39(3), pp. 225-236.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1541-9576
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10262
dc.descriptionArticle published in Food Protection Trends on 29 May 2019, available at: https://www.foodprotection.org/publications/food-protection-trends/archive/2019-05-laboratory-re-enactment-of-storage-practices-of-older-adults-to-determine-potential-implicat/.en_US
dc.description.abstractOlder adults are more susceptible to listeriosis, and many frequently consume ready-to-eat (RTE) foods associated with Listeria monocytogenes. Consequently, safe storage of RTE-food is essential to reduce the risks of listeriosis. This study aimed to re-enact domestic food-storage malpractices of older adult consumer in a laboratory to assess the potential impact on L. monocytogenes. Observed and self-reported data relating to domestic food-storage malpractices included prolonged storage of RTE foods and/or refrigeration temperatures exceeding recommendations (>5.0°C). Re-enactment occurred using soft-cheese and RTE meat inoculated with ~3.7 log CFU L. monocytogenes, stored at recommended temperatures (2.5°C)(n=110); temperatures exceeding recommendations (7.8°C)(n=110) and ambient-temperature (19.5°C)(n=55). Samples were analyzed every 24h for <21d. Results indicated L. monocytogenes grew at all storage temperatures. Average generation times indicated slower growth of L. monocytogenes at 2.5°C (94h t-1) than at 7.8°C (21.5h t-1) and 19.5°C (11h t-1), suggesting prolonged storage of RTE foods at increased L. monocytogenes populations (<7.6 log CFU/g), potentially making such foods unsafe for consumption. Findings indicate storage malpractices contrary to consumer recommendations intended to reduce the risk of foodborne disease, increase L. monocytogenes populations, thus increasing the potential for foodborne disease.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Society for Applied Microbiology (SfAM) Research Development Fund Grant £2000.00
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Association for Food Protectionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFood Protection Trends;
dc.titleLaboratory re-enactment of storage practices of older adults to determine potential implications for growth of listeria monocytogenesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-01
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01-31
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2020-05-29
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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