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dc.contributor.authorChinowsky, P.
dc.contributor.authorSchweikert, A.
dc.contributor.authorHayles, Carolyn
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-08T16:46:52Z
dc.date.available2019-03-08T16:46:52Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-30
dc.identifier.citationChinowsky, P., Schweikert, A. and Hayles, C. (2014) 'Potential impact of climate change on municipal buildings in South Africa', Procedia Economics and Finance, 18, pp.456-464.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2212-5671
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10351
dc.descriptionArticle published in Procedia Economics and Finance available open access at https://doi.org/10.1016/S2212-5671(14)00963-0en_US
dc.description.abstractMunicipal buildings are an essential component of daily life. Without schools, hospitals and other public buildings, society and economy could not function. Therefore a failure to consider the potential impact of climate change on municipal buildings would be both costly and detrimental to sustainable development. In this paper the authors present research undertaken to ascertain the potential impacts of climate impacts on municipal buildings in South Africa. A two-phase approach was adopted. Firstly the appropriate climate effects on a given building inventory, in a selected location, were determined; then the cost impacts on that building (based on a set of stressor-response functions) were applied. The results of the study predict that the total impact of climate change on buildings in South Africa could vary between USD $42.7 million average annual costs in the median scenario and USD $214.3 million average annual costs in the maximum scenario. The results presented are all incurred costs, which need to be addressed to avoid health and safety issues. However costs would be much higher if the existing stock was augmented without considering climate change impacts. The research provides an understanding of the cost of climate change and how the maintenance and adaptation of the unsustainable buildings may divert resources from sustainable development. The results of the research may also present an opportunity for existing buildings to be retrofitted with alternative, sustainable technologies, which serve to decrease vulnerability to climate change impacts going forward.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProcedia Economics and Finance;
dc.subjectAdaptationen_US
dc.subjectClimate Changeen_US
dc.subjectClimate Stressorsen_US
dc.subjectSustainable Developmenten_US
dc.titlePotential Impact of Climate Change on Municipal Buildings in South Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/S2212-5671(14)00963-0
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-03-08


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  • Sustainable and Resilient Built Environment group (SuRBe) [75]
    The overarching aims of the Sustainable and Resilient Built Environment (SuRBe) Research Group are to augment the sustainability and resilience of the built environment, improve occupant quality of life and adapt to, and mitigate, climate change through our work.

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