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dc.contributor.authorJennings, George
dc.contributor.authorCynarski, Wojciech
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-02T09:29:04Z
dc.date.available2019-07-02T09:29:04Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-01
dc.identifier.citationJennings, G. & Cynarski, W. (2019) 'Martial arts in postcolonial times: Local theories for local contexts', Ido Movement for Culture: Journal of Martial Arts Anthropology, 19(3), 11-23.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10597
dc.descriptionArticle published in Ido Movement for Culture: Journal of Martial Arts Anthropology on 01 July 2019, available open access at: http://imcjournal.com/index.php/en/volume-xix-2019/contents-number-3/1489-martial-arts-in-postcolonial-times-local-theories-for-local-contexts.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground. Up to now, the social organisation and practise of the world’s ghting systems has been understood through estab- lished and popular trends in sociological theory developed primarily in Western Europe and North America. Problem and aim. As an alternative, researchers can turn to theories local to the culture in question, in order to understand its people on their own terms, as these theories are written largely for and by them in their own language. Method. e authors employed local theory in their analysis of two martial arts associations that focus on the cultivation of national warrior identities. Based on long-standing case studies on Japanese Budo institutions in Poland and Xilam in its native Mexico, they demonstrate how local social theories can assist the understanding of belonging, embodiment, identity and nationalism in postcolonial times. Results. A local warrior identity was identi ed in both Polish Budo and Mexican Xilam martial arts organisations. e local social theories enabled the authors to examine these identities in terms of postcolonial identity formation in relation to the nations in question. Conclusions. Martial arts researchers should employ local theories as well as the more popular canon from social scienti c disci- plines. Local theories enable detailed appreciation of the history, culture and politics of the country where a martial art has been developed or is being practised and transmitted.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIdokan Poland Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIdo Movement for Culture. Journal of Martial Arts Anthropology;
dc.subjectmartial artsen_US
dc.subjecttheoryen_US
dc.subjectsocial theoryen_US
dc.subjectpost colonialismen_US
dc.subjectPolanden_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.titleMartial Arts in Postcolonial Times: Local Theories for Local Contextsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.14589/ido.19.3.2
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-02-15
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-02
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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