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dc.contributor.authorCahill, Micheál
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Jon
dc.contributor.authorCronin, John
dc.contributor.authorClark, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorCross, Matt
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Rhodri S.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-08T08:10:02Z
dc.date.available2019-07-08T08:10:02Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-20
dc.identifier.citationCahill, M.J., Oliver, J.L., Cronin, J.B., Clark, K.P., Cross, M.R. and Lloyd, R.S. (2019) 'Sled-Pull Load-Velocity Profiling and Implications for Sprint Training Prescription in Young Male Athletes', Sports, 7(5), p.119. DOI: 10.3390/sports7050119.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2075-4663
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10606
dc.descriptionArticle published in Sports on 20 May 2019, available open access at: https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7050119.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of individual load–velocity profiles and the between-athlete variation using the decrement in maximal velocity (Vdec) approach to prescribe training loads in resisted sled pulling in young athletes. Seventy high school, team sport, male athletes (age 16.7 ± 0.8 years) were recruited for the study. All participants performed one un-resisted and four resisted sled-pull sprints with incremental resistance of 20% BM. Maximal velocity was measured with a radar gun during each sprint and the load–velocity relationship established for each participant. A subset of 15 participants was used to examine the reliability of sled pulling on three separate occasions. For all individual participants, the load–velocity relationship was highly linear (r > 0.95). The slope of the load–velocity relationship was found to be reliable (coefficient of variation (CV) = 3.1%), with the loads that caused a decrement in velocity of 10, 25, 50, and 75% also found to be reliable (CVs = <5%). However, there was a large between-participant variation (95% confidence intervals (CIs)) in the load that caused a given Vdec, with loads of 14–21% body mass (% BM) causing a Vdec of 10%, 36–53% BM causing a Vdec of 25%, 71–107% BM causing a Vdec of 50%, and 107–160% BM causing a Vdec of 75%. The Vdec method can be reliably used to prescribe sled-pulling loads in young athletes, but practitioners should be aware that the load required to cause a given Vdec is highly individualized.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSports;
dc.titleSled-Pull Load-Velocity Profiling and Implications for Sprint Training Prescription in Young Male Athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/sports7050119
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-05-17
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-08
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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