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dc.contributor.authorMarsden, Nick
dc.contributor.authorBattle, Ceri
dc.contributor.authorCombellack, E.J.
dc.contributor.authorSabra, Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Keith
dc.contributor.authorDickson, W.
dc.contributor.authorWhitaker, Iain
dc.contributor.authorEvans, P.A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T08:42:52Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T08:42:52Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-12
dc.identifier.citationMarsden, N.J., Battle, C.E., Combellack, E.J., Sabra, A., Morris, K., Dickson, W.A., Whitaker, I.S. and Evans, P.A. (2016) 'The impact of socio-economic deprivation on burn injury: a nine-year retrospective study of 6441 patients', Burns, 42(2), pp.446-452. DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2015.08.019.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1879-1409
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10647
dc.descriptionArticle published in Burns on 12 January 2016, available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2015.08.019.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Low socio-economic status is thought to be associated with increased burn risk, however the significance and generalisability across different populations and cultures has been questioned. Methods: A nine-year retrospective study of burn presentations to a large teaching hospital (2005–2014) was performed to investigate the association between socio-economic status and burns. Demographic and injury data was collected via the trust ‘Information portal’. The Welsh Index of Multiple: Deprivation 2011 was used to score for socio-economic status. Chi-squared test and Odds Ratios were calculated and statistical significance defined as p < 0.05 throughout. Results: 6441 burns were identified, with 755 (11.7%) admitted. Overall incidence rates were the highest published in the UK (0.35/1000/year) with sub group analysis showing the highest rates in under fives and males. Significant relationships between both age and burn mechanism and gender and burn mechanism (p = 0.0005) were identified. Scald (67.1%) was the most common mechanism with the upper limb (48%) most commonly burned. Chi square analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between socio-economic deprivation, age and burn incidence (p ≤ 0.0005), with a disproportionately high number of burns in patients under the age of 16 in the most deprived quintile (OR 1.23; 95% CI 1.06–1.44). Conclusion: This study specifically highlights patients under the age of 16 living in poorer socio-economic areas as the most at risk of suffering burns receiving hospital attention. This study demonstrates burns as a significant public health issue, and the results should aid in designing specific burn prevention strategies to target high-risk groups.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBurns;
dc.titleThe impact of socio-economic deprivation on burn injury: A nine-year retrospective study of 6441 patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2015.08.019
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-08-12
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-30
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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