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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Aled Edward Lloyd
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Lydia
dc.contributor.authorPritchard, Manon
dc.contributor.authorThomas, David
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Rowena
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-02T10:33:44Z
dc.date.available2019-08-02T10:33:44Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-24
dc.identifier.citationRoberts, A.E.L., Powell, L.C., Pritchard, M.F., Thomas, D.W. and Jenkins, R.E. (2019) 'Anti-pseudomonad activity of manuka honey and antibiotics in a specialised ex vivo model simulating cystic fibrosis lung infection', Frontiers in Microbiology, 10, p.869. DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.00869.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10675
dc.descriptionArticle published in Frontiers in Microbiology on 24 April 2019, available open access at: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.00869.en_US
dc.description.abstractPseudomonas aeruginosa causes problematic chronic lung infections in those suffering from cystic fibrosis. This is due to its antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and its ability to form robust biofilm communities with increased antimicrobial tolerances. Using novel antimicrobials or repurposing current ones is required in order to overcome these problems. Manuka honey is a natural antimicrobial agent that has been used for many decades in the treatment of chronic surface wounds with great success, particularly those infected with P. aeruginosa. Here we aim to determine whether the antimicrobial activity of manuka honey could potentially be repurposed to inhibit pulmonary P. aeruginosa infections using two ex vivo models. P. aeruginosa isolates (n = 28) from an international panel were tested for their susceptibility to manuka honey and clinically relevant antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, and tobramycin), alone and in combination, using conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST). To increase clinical applicability, two ex vivo porcine lung (EVPL) models (using alveolar and bronchiolar tissue) were used to determine the anti-biofilm effects of manuka honey alone and in combination with antibiotics. All P. aeruginosa isolates were susceptible to manuka honey, however, varying incidences of resistance were seen against antibiotics. The combination of sub-inhibitory manuka honey and antibiotics using conventional AST had no effect on activity against the majority of isolates tested. Using the two ex vivo models, 64% (w/v) manuka honey inhibited many of the isolates where abnormally high concentrations of antibiotics could not. Typically, combinations of both manuka honey and antibiotics had increased antimicrobial activity. These results highlight the potential of manuka honey as a future antimicrobial for the treatment of pulmonary P. aeruginosa isolates, clearing potential infection reservoirs within the upper airway.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the (Jane) Hodge Foundation (Awarded to RJ in November 2014) and Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research and Enterprise Investment Fund (Awarded to AR and RJ in November 2015).
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Microbiology;
dc.titleAnti-pseudomonad Activity of Manuka Honey and Antibiotics in a Specialized ex vivo Model Simulating Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.00869
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-04-14
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-08-02
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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