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dc.contributor.authorNankervis, Alan
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Julia
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Roslyn
dc.contributor.authorMontague, Alan
dc.contributor.authorPrikshat, Verma
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T07:05:47Z
dc.date.available2019-10-15T07:05:47Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-31
dc.identifier.citationNankervis, A., Connell, J., Cameron, R., Montague, A., & Prikshat, V. (2019). ‘Are we there yet?’Australian HR professionals and the Fourth Industrial Revolution', Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1744-7941
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10776
dc.descriptionArticle published in Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources on 31 August 2019 (online), available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/1744-7941.12245.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough still in its early stages, the Fourth Industrial Revolution (FIR), which involves a broad range of artificial intelligence, robotics and machine learning technologies, will fundamentally change the way many of us work and relate to one another. Driven by technology, this transformation presents a range of challenges, as well as opportunities, where we might expect Human Resource (HR) professionals would lead the way. However, little is currently known in relation to how prepared HR professionals in Australia are to ready their organisations for this new era of work and associated resourcing. Consequently, this paper goes some way towards closing that gap. Specifically, the study reported here sets out to explore the levels of preparedness amongst Australian HRM professionals for the impact of the FIR on organisations, workplaces, jobs and skills, as well as on their own professional roles and competencies. The study utilised a sequential mixed methods research design with two phases, the first was qualitative focus groups (n = 5) followed by a quantitative online survey of selected senior HR practitioners (n = 150). The findings indicate that, while most believe that FIR technologies might be useful for their organisations and assist with improving job performance, increasing productivity and making jobs easier for employees, contrarily many did not intend to use them in the foreseeable future. Marginal support was also evident in relation to the potential contributions of FIR technologies to HR process enhancement and overall HR effectiveness. Most respondents were also not impressed with the lack of current Australian government FIR strategies and policies.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRMIT University & Australian HR Instituteen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAsia Pacific Journal of Human Resources;
dc.subjectHR Professionals , Fourth Industrial Revolutionen_US
dc.subjectartificial intelligence, Fourth Industrial Revolution, HRM, machine learning, roboticsen_US
dc.title‘Are we there yet?’ Australian HR professionals and the Fourth Industrial Revolutionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/1744-7941.12245
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-07-21
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-10-15
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-08-31
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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