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dc.contributor.authorTatham, Arthur
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T13:43:56Z
dc.date.available2019-10-21T13:43:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-04
dc.identifier.citationTatham, A. (2015) Cereal Allergens. In: Wrigley, C.W., Corke, H., Seetharaman, K. and Faubion, J. (eds.) Encyclopedia of Food Grains. Vol. 2. Academic Press.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10787
dc.descriptionBook Chapter in Encyclopedia of Food Grains Vol. 2. (2015), available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-394437-5.00085-1.en_US
dc.description.abstractWheat, maize, and rice are the most widely consumed food grains in the world. It is unsurprising, therefore, that they are associated with both food intolerances (wheat and rice) and allergies (all). Two types of wheat allergy, bakers' asthma and wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, are well characterized in relation to the allergens that elicit an allergic response. Wheat allergy and contact dermatitis, however, exhibit a wide range of allergens that will elicit a response. As patterns of cereal consumption change, so do the patterns of allergy and intolerance. For example, increasing wheat consumption in Eastern Asia has led to a rise in wheat-related intolerances and allergies in wheat-consuming populations.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.titleCereal Allergensen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-394437-5.00085-1
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-10-21


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