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dc.contributor.authorCahill, M.
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Jon
dc.contributor.authorCronin, J.
dc.contributor.authorClark, K.
dc.contributor.authorCross, M.
dc.contributor.authorRhodri, Lloyd
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-15T16:29:36Z
dc.date.available2019-11-15T16:29:36Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-19
dc.identifier.citationCahill, M.J., Oliver, J.L., Cronin, J.B., Clark, K.P., Cross, M.R. and Lloyd, R.S. (2019) 'Influence of resisted sled‐push training on the sprint force‐velocity profile of male high school athletes', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. DOI: 10.1111/sms.13600.
dc.identifier.issn0905-7188
dc.identifier.issn1600-0838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10840
dc.descriptionArticle published in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports on 19 November 2019, available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13600.en_US
dc.description.abstractSled pushing is a commonly used form of resisted sprint training, however little empirical evidence exists, especially in youth populations. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of unresisted and resisted sled pushing across multiple loads. Fifty high school athletes were assigned to an unresisted (n=12), or 3 resisted groups; light (n=14), moderate (n=13) and heavy (n=11) resistance that caused a 25, 50 and 75% velocity decrement in maximum sprint speed, respectively. All participants performed two sled push training sessions twice weekly for 8 weeks. Before and after the training intervention, the participants performed a series of jump, strength and sprint testing to assess athletic performance. Split times between 5 – 20 m improved significantly across all resisted groups (all p<0.05, d = 0.34 – 1.16) but did not improve significantly with unresisted sprinting. For all resisted groups gains were greatest over the first 5 m (d = 0.67-0.84) and then diminished over each subsequent 5 m split (d = 0.08-0.57). The magnitude of gains in split times was greatest within the heavy group. Small but non-significant within group effects were found in pre to post force-velocity profiles. There was a main effect of time but no interaction effects as all groups increased force and power, although the greatest increases were observed with the heavy load (d = 0.50-0.51). The results of this study suggest that resisted sled pushing with any load was superior to unresisted sprint training, and that heavy loads may elicit the greatest gains in sprint performance over short distances.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports;
dc.subjectHorizontal resistance trainingen_US
dc.subjectresisted sprintingen_US
dc.subjectaccelerationen_US
dc.titleInfluence of resisted sled-push training on the sprint force-velocity profile of male high school athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13600
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-06
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2020-11-19


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