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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Graham
dc.contributor.authorAngel, Lianna
dc.contributor.authorGray, Linsay
dc.contributor.authorCopeland, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorVan Godwin, Jordan
dc.contributor.authorSegrott, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorHallingberg, Britt
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-30T15:12:46Z
dc.date.available2020-01-30T15:12:46Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-21
dc.identifier.citationMoore, G.F., Angel, L., Gray, L., Copeland, L., Van Godwin, J., Segrott, J. and Hallingberg, B. (2020) 'Associations of Socioeconomic Status, Parental Smoking and Parental E-Cigarette Use with 10–11-Year-Old Children’s Perceptions of Tobacco Cigarettes and E-Cigarettes: Cross Sectional Analysis of the CHETS Wales 3 Survey', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(3), p.683.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10910
dc.descriptionArticle published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health available open access at https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030683en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study examines primary schoolchildren’s perceptions of e-cigarettes and tobacco cigarettes, and associations with parental smoking, vaping and socioeconomic status. Methods: Survey of 2218 10–11-year-old children in 73 schools in Wales. Results: Overall, 36% reported that a parent figure smoked compared to 21% for vaping, with parental smoking lower in affluent families (OR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.76). Overall, 1% had tried a cigarette, while 5% had tried an e-cigarette. Most said they would not smoke or vape in 2 years’ time; susceptibility to vaping (20%) was higher than smoking (12%). Exposure to and perceptions of tobacco cigarettes were more positive for children of smokers. Having a parent who vaped was associated with exposure to and positive perceptions of e-cigarettes, but not smoking. Most children perceived e-cigarettes as used by adults to stop smoking (64%). Susceptibility to smoking (OR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.41 to 0.79) and vaping (OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.99) were lower among children who perceived e-cigarettes as cessation aids. Conclusions: Parental smoking continues to be concentrated in poorer families. This study provides no evidence that parental vaping in the absence of smoking is associated with more positive perceptions of tobacco cigarettes. Communicating to children the role of e-cigarettes as cessation devices for smokers may help to limit their appeal to young peopleen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health;
dc.titleAssociations of Socioeconomic Status, Parental Smoking and Parental E‐Cigarette Use with10–11‐Year‐Old Children’s Perceptions of Tobacco Cigarettes and E‐Cigarettes:Cross Sectional Analysis of the CHETS Wales 3 Surveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030683
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-09
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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