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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorThirlaway, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorBowes, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorMeyers, Rob
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T15:40:00Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T15:40:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-15
dc.identifier.citationThomas, J., Thirlaway, K., Bowes, N. and Meyers, R. (2020) 'Effects of Combining Physical Activity with Psychotherapy on Mental Health and Well-being: A Systematic Review', Journal of Affective Disorders, 265, pp. 475-485. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.070en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
dc.identifier.issn1573-2517
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/10925
dc.descriptionArticle published in Journal of Affective Disorders available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.070en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective : Despite a vast evidence-base advocating the psychological benefits of physical activity, relatively little is understood about how combining physical activity with psychological therapies may influence these positive effects. The aim of this paper is to systematically analyse evidence from studies adopting a combined approach, and identify potential mechanisms of action on clinical outcomes. Methods : The Embase, PsycINFO and Medline (PubMed and OVID) databases were searched for applicable trials published up to December 2018. Relevant data was extracted from eligible studies, and the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) tool was utilised to objectively assess the quality of each study. Results : Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria, seven of which were rated as methodologically `strong'. Combining physical activity with psychological therapy consistently engendered positive effects on outcomes compared with treatment as usual. Similar improvements in psychological outcomes were observed in most (7/8) groups receiving physical activity alone. Increased levels of physical activity were observed in psychologically-informed interventions, however this effect was unrelated to changes in psychological outcomes. Limitations : Clinical and methodological heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses of results, while risk of bias detected in the studies may compromise overall validity of the findings. Conclusions : Physical activity interventions may be a viable alternative to psychological therapies, provided psychological approaches are incorporated into the implementation design (i.e. behavioural activation). Improved psychological outcomes may be observed regardless of `dose' received, however further research is required to ascertain whether psychosocial mechanisms of change mediate positive effects.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKESS2
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Affective Disorders;
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectPsychological therapyen_US
dc.subjectBehavioural activationen_US
dc.subjectMental healthen_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.titleEffects of combining physical activity with psychotherapy on mental health and well-being: A systematic reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.070
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-15
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-01-15
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-01-15
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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