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dc.contributor.authorSumner, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorCrone, Diane
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Colin
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorLoughren, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorJames, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-04T15:20:52Z
dc.date.available2020-05-04T15:20:52Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-08
dc.identifier.citationSumner, R.C., Crone, D.M., Baker, C., Hughes, S., Loughren, E.A. and James, D.V., 2020. Factors associated with attendance, engagement and wellbeing change in an arts on prescription intervention. Journal of Public Health, 42(1), pp.e88-e95.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1741-3842
dc.identifier.issn1741-3850
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11022
dc.descriptionArticle published in Journal of Public Health available at https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdz032en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground Arts on prescription interventions have grown in number in recent years with a corresponding evidence base in support. Despite the growth and presence of these interventions, there have been no evaluations to date as to what factors predict patient success within these referral schemes. Methods Using the largest cohort of patient data to date in the field (N = 1297), we set out to understand those factors that are associated with attendance, programme engagement and wellbeing change of patients. Factors associated with these outcomes were assessed using three binary logistic regression models. Results Baseline wellbeing was associated with each outcome, with higher baseline wellbeing being associated with attendance and engagement, and lower baseline wellbeing associated with positive wellbeing change. Additionally, deprivation was associated with attendance, with those from the median deprivation quintile being more likely to attend. Conclusions The role of baseline wellbeing in each outcome of these analyses is the most critical associative factor. Whilst those that are lower in wellbeing have more to gain from these interventions, they are also less likely to attend or engage, meaning they may need additional support in commencing these types of social prescribing interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Public Health;
dc.titleFactors associated with attendance, engagement and wellbeing change in an arts on prescription interventionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdz032
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-03-19
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-05-04
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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