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dc.contributor.authorCai, Yuexin
dc.contributor.authorXie, Mingwei
dc.contributor.authorSu, Yun
dc.contributor.authorTong, Zhaopeng
dc.contributor.authorWu, Xiaoyan
dc.contributor.authorXu, Wenchao
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jiahong
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Fei
dc.contributor.authorDang, Caiping
dc.contributor.authorChen, Guisheng
dc.contributor.authorLan, Liping
dc.contributor.authorShen, Jun
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Yiqing
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-02T09:51:25Z
dc.date.available2020-07-02T09:51:25Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-30
dc.identifier.citationCai, Y., Xie, M., Wu, X., Tong, Z., Su, Y., Xu, W., Li, J., Zhao, F., Dang, C., Chen, G. and Lan, L. (2020) 'Aberrant Functional and Causal Connectivity in Acute Tinnitus with Sensorineural Hearing Loss', Frontiers in Neuroscience, 14. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00592en_US
dc.identifier.issn1662-4548
dc.identifier.issn1662-453X (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11083
dc.descriptionArticle published in Frontiers in Neuroscience available open access at https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00592en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The neural bases in acute tinnitus remains largely undetected. The objective of this study was to identify the alteration of the brain network involved in patients with acute tinnitus and hearing loss. Methods: Acute tinnitus patients (n = 24) with hearing loss and age-, sex-, education-matched healthy controls (n = 21) participated in the current study and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning. Regional homogeneity and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation were used to investigate the local spontaneous neural activity and functional connectivity (FC), and Granger causality analysis (GCA) was used to analyze the undirected and directed connectivity of brain regions. Results: Compared with healthy subjects, acute tinnitus patients had a general reduction in FC between auditory and non-auditory brain regions. Based on FC analysis, the superior temporal gyrus (STG) revealed reduced undirected connectivity with non-auditory brain regions including the amygdala (AMYG), nucleus accumbens (NAc), the cerebellum, and postcentral gyrus (PoCG). Using the GCA algorithm, increased effective connectivity from the right AMYG to the right STG, and reduced connectivity from the right PoCG to the left NAc was observed in acute tinnitus patients with hearing loss. The pure-tone threshold was positively correlated with FC between the AMYG and STG, and negatively correlated with FC between the left NAc and the right PoCG. In addition, a negative association between the GCA value from the right PoCG to the left NAc and the THI scores was observed. Conclusion: Acute tinnitus patients have aberrant FC strength and causal connectivity in both the auditory and non-auditory cortex, especially in the STG, AMYG, and NAc. The current findings will provide a new perspective for understanding the neuropathophysiological mechanism in acute tinnitus.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in Neuroscience;
dc.titleAberrant Functional and Causal Connectivity in Acute Tinnitus With Sensorineural Hearing Lossen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00592
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-14
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-02
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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