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dc.contributor.authorRamirez-Campillo, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorCastillo, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorRaya-González, Javier
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Jason
dc.contributor.authorSáez de Villarreal, Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Rhodri S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T14:23:46Z
dc.date.available2020-09-02T14:23:46Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-11
dc.identifier.citationRamirez-Campillo, R., Castillo, D., Raya-González, J., Moran, J., Sáez de Villarreal, E. and Lloyd, R.S. (2020) 'Effects of plyometric jump training on jump and sprint performance in young male soccer players: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Sports Medicine.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1179-2035
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11130
dc.descriptionArticle published in Sports Medicine on 11 September 2020, available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-020-01337-1.en_US
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background: Even from a young age, modern soccer requires high levels of physical fitness development, particularly jumping and sprinting. Plyometric jump training (PJT), combined with young athletes’ regular soccer sessions, has the potential to improve jumping and sprinting. However, studies exploring the effects of PJT are generally limited by small sample sizes. This problem of underpowered studies may thus be resolved by pooling study results in a meta-analysis. Objective: The objective of this systematic review with meta-analysis (SRMA) was to assess the effects of plyometric jump training (PJT) on jumping and sprinting among young male soccer players. Methods: The SRMA included peer-reviewed articles that incorporated PJT in healthy players (i.e., <23 years of age), a control group, and a measure of jumping or sprinting. Means and standard deviations of outcomes were converted to Hedges’ g effect sizes (ES), using the inverse variance random-effects model. Moderator analyses were conducted for PJT duration, frequency, total number of sessions, participants’ chronological age, and FIFA age categories (i.e., U-17 vs. U-20 vs. U-23). A multivariate random effects meta-regression was also conducted. Results: Thirty-three studies were included, comprising 1,499 participants. PJT improved vertical jump tests (ES = 0.60-0.98; all p < 0.01) and linear sprint performance (ES = 0.60-0.98; p < 0.03). Interventions of >7 weeks and >14 PJT sessions induced greater effects compared to PJT with ≤7 weeks and ≤14 total sessions on 10-m sprint performance (between-group p = 0.038). Conclusion. Therefore, PJT is effective in improving jumping and sprinting performance among young male soccer players. Greater 10-m linear sprinting improvements were noted after interventions >7 weeks duration and >14 sessions, suggesting a greater return from exposure to longer PJT interventions, partially in support for the adoption of a long-term approach to athletic development in young athletes. However, with reference to the findings of the meta-regression, and those from the remaining subgroup and single factors analysis, a robust confirmation regarding the moderator role of participant’s age, or PJT configuration effects on young soccer player’s fitness qualities needs future confirmation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSports Medicine;
dc.titleEffects of plyometric jump training on jump and sprint performance in young male soccer players: a systematic review and meta-analysis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-020-01337-1
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-20
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-09-02
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-09-11
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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