Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorByrne, Paul J.
dc.contributor.authorMoody, Jeremy A.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Stephen-Mark
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-10T11:49:44Z
dc.date.available2020-11-10T11:49:44Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-29
dc.identifier.citationByrne, P.J., Moody, J.A., Cooper, S.M. and Kinsella, S. (2019) 'Acute Effects of “Composite” Training on Neuromuscular and Fast Stretch-Shortening Cycle Drop Jump Performance in Hurling Players', The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003327en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287 (electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11201
dc.descriptionArticle published in Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research available at https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003327en_US
dc.description.abstract“Composite” training is a term developed by the authors and defined as the combination of a plyometric exercise with an explosive activity such as a sprint run, performed as a “combined repetition”/session. The purposes of this study were to investigate the acute effect of a “composite” training session on neuromuscular and fast stretch-shortening cycle bounce drop jumps (BDJs) in hurling players' immediately, after session, and after 7 days of recovery. Eight hurling players first completed a drop jump test to identify individual BDJ drop height, followed 72 hours later with a single “composite” training session. Three repetition maximum (3RM) back squat strength, BDJ, countermovement jump (CMJ), and sprint performance testing were performed 10 minutes before and immediately after session and 7 day after session. An analysis of variance reported a significant decrease in CMJ measures (height, velocity, and eccentric rate of force development) and sprint performance from presession to postsession (p ≤ 0.05). Moreover, a significant increase was evident for CMJ performance (height and power), sprint performance (5 and 20 m), 3RM back squat strength, and BDJ performance (reactive strength index and height) from postsession to post–7-day recovery (p ≤ 0.05). Pairwise comparisons indicated that absolute and relative 3RM strength significantly increased from presession to post–7 days (absolute 3RM: p = 0.0001; relative 3RM: p = 0.01). The findings indicate that “composite” training results in an immediate decline in CMJ measures after session possibly due to acute muscle fatigue, and supercompensation augments maximum lower-limb strength after 7 days of recovery.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNational Strength & Conditioning Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.;
dc.titleAcute effects of ‘composite’ training on neuromuscular and fast stretch-shortening cycle drop-jump performance in hurling playersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003327
dcterms.dateAccepted2019
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
dc.refexceptionThere was a delay in securing the final peer-reviewed text
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record