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dc.contributor.authorByrne, Paul J.
dc.contributor.authorMoody, Jeremy A.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Stephen-Mark
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Eoin
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-13T12:30:41Z
dc.date.available2020-11-13T12:30:41Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-25
dc.identifier.citationByrne, P.J., Moody, J.A., Cooper, S.M., Farrell, E. and Kinsella, S. (2020) 'Short-Term Effects of “Composite” Training on Strength, Jump, and Sprint Performance in Hurling Players', The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003820en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287 (electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11212
dc.descriptionArticle published in The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research available at https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003820en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to compare the short-term effects of “composite” training to sprint training on strength, jump, and sprint acceleration performance in hurling players. A randomized counterbalanced group design with baseline test, pretest and post-test measures was used. Twenty-five hurling players volunteered to participate and 21 completed the study. Subjects were divided into a “composite” (COMP group, n = 10) or a sprint training (SPRINT group, n = 11) group. Both groups trained twice per week for 7 weeks with the SPRINT group performing 6 repetitions of 20 m sprints and the COMP group completing 6 repetitions (1 repetition = 3 bounce drop jumps [BDJs] with a 20 m sprint after 15 seconds recovery). Significant differences existed pretraining to post-training for the COMP group for BDJ contact time (−7.25%; p = 0.05) and countermovement jump (CMJ) variables (height: 7.43%, p = 0.006; force: 5.24%, p = 0.05; power: 15.11%, p = 0.001). No significant differences were found between groups at baseline and for group by time interactions. Significant improvements were observed pretraining to post-training in both groups for the following: absolute 3 repetition maximum (3RM) back squat strength (12.73–17.62%, p = 0.01), 5 m (5.74–9.49%, p = 0.006–0.04), 10 m (4.27–5.59%, p = 0.007–0.02), and 20 m (3.35–3.98%, p = 0.003–0.01). In conclusion, “composite” training is effective in enhancing fast stretch-shortening cycle efficiency inducing CMJ force and power augmentation. However, “composite” and sprint training are effective training approaches for enhancing maximal strength and sprint performance in a time efficient manner in hurling players.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNational Strength & Conditioning Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research;
dc.titleShort-Term Effects of “Composite” Training on Strength, Jump, and Sprint Performance in Hurling Playersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003820
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-09-01
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2021-09-25
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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