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dc.contributor.authorPérez-Martínez, Vanesa
dc.contributor.authorSanz-Barbero, Belen
dc.contributor.authorFerrer-Cascales, Rosario
dc.contributor.authorBowes, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorAyala, Alba
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-SanSegundo, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorAlbaladejo-Blázquez, Natalia
dc.contributor.authorRosati, Nicoletta
dc.contributor.authorNeves, Sofia
dc.contributor.authorVieira, C.P.
dc.contributor.authorJankowiak, B.
dc.contributor.authorWaszyńska, Katarzyna
dc.contributor.authorVives-Cases, Carmen
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-20T16:03:30Z
dc.date.available2020-11-20T16:03:30Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-13
dc.identifier.citationPérez-Martínez, V., Sanz-Barbero, B., Ferrer-Cascales, R., Bowes, N., Ayala, A., Sánchez-SanSegundo, M., Albaladejo-Blázquez, N., Rosati, N., Neves, S., Vieira, C.P., Jankowiak, B.,et al (2020) 'The role of social support in machismo and acceptance of violence among adolescents in Europe, Lights4Violence baseline results', Journal of Adolescent Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11229
dc.descriptionArticle published in Journal of Adolescent Health available open access at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.007en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose To analyze the potential association between social support, experiences of violence, and sociodemographic characteristics of adolescents and the likelihood of acceptance of violence and machismo in different European countries. Methods Cross-sectional design. We recruited 1,555 participants ages 13–16 from secondary schools in Alicante (Spain), Rome (Italy), Iasi (Romania), Matosinhos (Portugal), Poznan (Poland), and Cardiff (UK). We used linear regression models to identify how social support from teachers and parents, experiences of violence—dating violence, bullying, cyberbullying, abuse in childhood—and sociodemographic characteristics were associated with violent thinking, specifically: machismo and acceptance of violence. The analysis was stratified by sex. Results Acceptance of violence was higher for those who had lower perceived social support from parents (βgirls = −154, p < .001; βboys = −.114, p = .019) for both sexes. Perpetration of bullying and/or cyberbullying was associated with higher scores for machismo and acceptance of violence for both sexes (βgirls = .067, p = .035; βboys = .225, p < .001; (βgirls = .118, p < .001; βboys = .210, p < .001). Being the victim of dating violence, having suffered physical and/or sexual abuse in childhood, and lower perceived social support from teachers were associated with higher scores for both machismo and acceptance of violence. These associations differed between girls and boys. Conclusions Machismo and acceptance of violence are widely present amongst adolescents in different European countries. Our results suggest the importance of providing educational/psycho-educational interventions with boys and girls to prevent these attitudes and, in turn, prevent interpersonal violence, including bullying and dating violence.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Adolescent Health;
dc.titleThe Role of Social Support in Machismo and Acceptance of Violence Among Adolescents in Europe. Lights4Violence Baseline Resultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.007
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-09-07
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11-20
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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