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dc.contributor.authorPinney, Joel
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorNewbury, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-12T15:12:29Z
dc.date.available2021-01-12T15:12:29Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-13
dc.identifier.citationPinney, J., Carroll, F., Newbury, P. (2020) 'Robots and Uncertainty: An investigation into the impact of the aesthetic visualisation on people’s trust of robots', The 8th International Conference on Robot Intelligence Technology and Applications, Oct 30, 2020 - Nov 1, 2020 Cardiff Metropolitan University
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11266
dc.descriptionConference paper presented at The 8th International Conference on Robot Intelligence Technology and Applications, Oct 30, 2020 - Nov 1, 2020 Cardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractHuman senses have evolved to pick-up on sensory cues. Beyond our perception, they play an integral role in our emotional processing, learning, and interpretation. They are what help us to sculpt our everyday experiences and can be triggered by aesthetics to form the foundations of our interactions with each other and our surroundings. Aesthetics, described by the ancient Greeks as sensation, is the ability to receive stimulation from one or more of our five bodily senses. In terms of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), robots also have the ‘potential’ senses to interact with the environment and people around them. They can offer an ‘embodiment’ that has the potential to make the interaction with technology a more natural, engaging, and acceptable experience. However, for many reasons, people still do not seem to trust and accept robots. This paper explores that robots have unique opportunities to improve their facilities for empathy, emotion, and social awareness beyond their more cognitive functionalities. By applying various different design elements to design of the human robotic interaction, we have revealed that certain facial aesthetics seem to be more trustworthy than others (cartoon face versus human face etc) and also certain visual variables (i.e. blur) afforded uncertainty more so than others. Consequentially, this paper reports uncertainties in and between the visualisations greatly influenced participants willingness to accept and trust the robot. By understanding what aesthetic elements initiate what affective processes, this paper further enriches our knowledge of how we might design for certain emotions, feelings and ultimately more socially acceptable and trusting robotic experiences.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKessen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe 8th IEEE International Conference on Robot Intelligence Technology and Applications (RiTA);
dc.subjectaesthetics, robots, trust, human robot interaction.en_US
dc.titleRobots and Uncertainty: An investigation into the impact of the aesthetic visualisation on people’s trust of robots.en_US
dc.typeConference paperen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-11-11
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden_US
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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