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dc.contributor.authorMendez-Rebolledo, Guillermo
dc.contributor.authorFigueroa-Ureta, Romina
dc.contributor.authorMoya-Mura, Fernanda
dc.contributor.authorGuzmán-Muñoz, Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorRamirez-Campillo, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Rhodri S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-11T09:55:45Z
dc.date.available2021-02-11T09:55:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-20
dc.identifier.issn1056-6716
dc.identifier.issn1543-3072 (electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11310
dc.descriptionArticle published in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation available at https://doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2020-0376en_US
dc.description.abstractContext: Few reports have analyzed the effects of neuromuscular (NM) training programs on the injury incidence among youth female track and field athletes. Objective: To determine the effects of a NM training on reducing lower limb injury incidence and to establish its effects on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, balance, 30-m sprint and joint position sense in youth female track and field athletes. Design: Single-blind, randomized-controlled clinical trial. Setting: Sports research laboratory. Participants: Twenty-two female athletes were allocated into two groups: Conventional (CONV) training (n = 11; age = 15.3 ± 2.1 years) and NM training (n = 11; age = 15.0 ± 2.7 years). Interventions: Interventions were performed during a pre-season of six weeks. The CONV training included anaerobic, strength and aerobic trainings. The NM training consisted of a multi-component program that integrated jumps, landings and running with strength, endurance, agility, balance and CORE training. Main outcome measures: A follow-up of the cohorts was carried out through the evaluation of lower limb injuries (main outcome) during a regular season (weeks 7 to 18). Secondary outcomes were measured before and after the intervention: Y-Balance Test, active joint repositioning, ground reaction force and CMJ height. Results: The injury incidence rate was 17.89 injuries per 1000 h athlete-exposure in CONV training, and 6.58 in NM training (RR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.82; p = 0.044). Particularly, the medial tibial stress syndrome incidence rate was 5.96 injuries per 1000 h athlete-exposure in CONV training, and 0.82 in NM training (RR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.02 to 1.12; p = 0.012). In addition, a significant training x time interaction was noted favoring improvements in 30-m sprint and CMJ height after NM. Conclusions: NM training may improve youth female athlete’s physical fitness and reduce their injury relative risk of medial tibial stress syndrome injury.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Sport Rehabilitation;
dc.subjectProprioceptionen_US
dc.subjectplyometric exerciseen_US
dc.subjectresistance trainingen_US
dc.subjectathletic injuriesen_US
dc.subjectleg injuriesen_US
dc.subjectyouth sportsen_US
dc.titleThe Protective Effect of Neuromuscular Training on the Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome in Youth Female Track and Field Athletes: A Clinical Trial and Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2020-0376
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-05
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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