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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Ellen W.
dc.contributor.authorSamuel, Emma
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Helen R.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-15T10:12:47Z
dc.date.available2021-03-15T10:12:47Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-15
dc.identifier.citationEvans, E., Samuel, E., Redmond, E. and Taylor, H. (2021) 'Exploring Listeria monocytogenes perceptions in small and medium sized food manufacturers: technical leaders' perceptions of risk, control and responsibility', Food Control, p.108078. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2021.108078
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/11340
dc.descriptionArticle published in Food Control available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2021.108078en_US
dc.description.abstractDue to its ability to colonise, grow and form in niches in food manufacturing environments, the management of Listeria monocytogenes can be complex, particularly for food manufacturing small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). In addition to an effective food safety management system, the perceptions of risk, control and responsibility within a food manufacturing business are important influential factors associated with the management of L. monocytogenes. Research exploring managerial perspectives of L. monocytogenes in food manufacturer SMEs is lacking. Consequently, this study conducted in-depth interviews (n=10) with technical leaders from food manufacturing SMEs to ascertain factors that may influence listeria management, such as factors associated with cultural dimensions. Perceived risks associated with L. monocytogenes were related to business reputation and consumer health impacts, but such events were perceived to be unlikely. Technical leaders reported having clearly defined and well executed processes to ensure food safety; but for some, L. monocytogenes, as a single pathogen was seldom considered. Despite acknowledging that “everyone” had responsibility for ensuring control of the pathogen, technical leaders indicated that the ‘people’ attributes associated with organisational culture were difficult factors to control and manage. Trust in staff ability to assure food safety was widely discussed, with technical leaders acknowledging that food handlers may not necessarily have specific knowledge regarding L. monocytogenes. Some technical leaders perceived themselves as having the greatest levels of responsibility for L. monocytogenes. Overall, technical leaders perceived a medium level of risk, with high levels of control and high levels of responsibility for L. monocytogenes. Optimistic bias, illusion of invulnerability, illusion of control, and perceived attribution of responsibility are discussed, which may hinder implementation of effective listeria management in SME food manufacturing businesses. Consideration of specific pathogen risks in food manufacture in relation to food safety cultural dimensions may assist development of highly targeted and effective interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFood Control;
dc.subjectPerceived responsibilityen_US
dc.subjectoptimistic biasen_US
dc.subjectillusion of invulnerabilityen_US
dc.subjectillusion of controlen_US
dc.subjectperceived attribution of responsibilityen_US
dc.subjectfood safety cultureen_US
dc.titleExploring Listeria monocytogenes perceptions in small and medium sized food manufacturers: technical leaders' perceptions of risk, control and responsibilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-03-09
rioxxterms.funderCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectCardiff Metropolian (Internal)en_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2022-03-15
rioxxterms.funder.project37baf166-7129-4cd4-b6a1-507454d1372een_US


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