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dc.contributor.authorCoward, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-17T11:16:48Z
dc.date.available2008-10-17T11:16:48Z
dc.date.issued2002-09-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationDesign History Society Conference 2002 - Situated Knowledges: Consumption, Production and Identity in a Global Context, pp.16en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/179
dc.descriptionAuthor's post-print
dc.description.abstractThis paper makes the case that design, particularly in the context of non-western, developing, countries requires a different framework for both execution and evaluation from those frameworks that have become standard in western economies and cultures. The paper examines the central proposition that design in this context should be more appropriately regarded and understood as process, rather than as residing in the formal qualities and the cultural, social and economic symbolism of the resulting objects. To do this it makes reference to two recent design-led projects and other material from within the research group of which the author is a member, in order to examine issues related to intention, measures of success and of sustainability, benefits, indigenous skills, timescales, education and training, markets and distribution, local and "global" influences and the people involved throughout. The paper highlights the need for increased understanding of the context and greater acknowledgement, on the part of western designers, educators and historians of, amongst other factors, traditional/indigenous knowledge, experience and skills, which appear to be crucial to success in this, and possibly other, aspects of design.en_US
dc.subjectDesign
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectSustainability
dc.titleProcess Precedes Product: a developing paradigmen_US


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