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dc.contributor.authorCrossfield, James
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-21T10:13:21Z
dc.date.available2011-03-21T10:13:21Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/2615
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to examine whether there is a relationship between repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and repeated-agility performance. Relationship tests were used between pre-training and post-training performance variables, which were followed up by an analysis of differences after the training intervention. Seven male sports students performed a repeated-bout 40-metre sprint and zig-zag agility test, pre-training and post-training, as well as completing a six-week repeated-sprint training programme with a reducing recovery period in between sprints. Each sprint time was recorded and the data was utilised to calculate the three mean performance variables; peak sprint time, mean sprint time and performance decrement percentage (PD). Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were used to determine the strength and direction of the relationships between performance variables and T-tests were used to examine whether there were significant changes in each variable, supporting any links found between sprint and agility. The data analysis revealed no significant relationships between sprint and agility performance variables. There was only one significant relationship found between sprint and agility performance, which was a moderate strength relationship that linked the PD variables (r=0.878, p=0.009). The sprint training intervention significantly improved two repeated-agility performance variables (p<0.05). Peak agility time improved from 5.128 ± 0.110 seconds to 4.737 ± 0.158 seconds and mean agility time improved from 5.263 ± 0.137 seconds to 4.908 ± 0.162 seconds. However, agility PD did not change significantly. In addition, RSA was not improved from the sprint training intervention undertaken. In summary, the results of the current study indicate that although repeated-agility performance may not be significantly related to RSA, a repeated-sprint training programme can improve the overall agility performance. Therefore, a repeated-sprint training intervention should be considered when aiming to enhance repeated-agility performance, as improvements were significant.en_GB
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen_GB
dc.subjectSprint and Agilityen_GB
dc.titleIs repeated-sprint ability related to repeated-agility performance and does a repeated-sprint training intervention improve repeated-agility performance?en_GB
dc.typeThesisen_GB


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