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dc.contributor.authorPrice-Bates, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-25T13:17:25Z
dc.date.available2011-03-25T13:17:25Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/2666
dc.description.abstractPoor heart rate recovery (HRR) after repeated sprint exercise has been attributed to the high sympathetic activity, associated with local metabolite persistence (Norepinephrine, H+, Lactate, Pi) in recovery (Perini et al. 1989, Burchheit et al. 2007). An accumulation in these metabolites has been shown to reduce muscular performance (Harris et al. 1976, Hermansen et al. 1981, Fabiato et al. 1978) and is associated with a decrease in repeated sprint ability (RSA, Bishop et al. 2003). The purpose of this study was to determine whether HRR between sprints is correlated to RSA, and if improvements in RSA, following training, were related to changes in HRR. Seven moderately trained team sports athletes (21.5 ± 0.93yr, VO2max 52.7±4.45) completed 6 repeated sprint training sessions (RST-16 x 40m sprints, with 3 second ever decreasing intervals starting with 66 s) over 6 weeks, alongside team sport training. Participants HRR was measured between each sprint within the protocol and summed up to provide a total heart rate recovery score for the session (tHRR). Participant’s activity between sprints was standardised to maximise the reliability of the heart rate recordings. Subject best sprint time, total sprint time and performance decrements were recorded each week, via smart speed software, and a VO2max test was administered pre and post the 6 weeks of training.en_GB
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen_GB
dc.subjectSprintingen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between heart rate recovery, during rest intervals in short duration repeated sprints exercise, and repeated sprint abilityen_GB
dc.typeThesisen_GB


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