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dc.contributor.authorOwen-Moylan, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T12:39:29Z
dc.date.available2012-10-18T12:39:29Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3365
dc.descriptionMA English & Creative Writingen
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on the critical reflection of the author’s own creative work, using chapters of The Butterfly Waltz, and on the process of reflective practice itself with particular regard to the work of Gregory Bateson’s Levels of Learning (Bateson 1972). Using the theme of female identity through a critical analysis of the Narrator, Character and Author, this work sets out to examine whether any practice based research can be complete without a full investigation of the creative writing process in addition to the writing content. The main findings are that textual analysis of the creative writing shows it to be a limited reflective tool in fully understanding the role of the author. By reflecting on whether there is a ‘writing process’ and then applying Tosey’s Transformative Framework for Learning (Tosey 2006) to creative writing, it was intended to test whether the current established academic model for the teaching and learning of creative writing was adequate. The main findings are that while there is much that can be gleaned through the reflective analysis and deconstruction of the output of a creative writer, it would be more useful to fully understand the creative writing process and the working of the unconscious in creating art. It is argued that studying literature is not the same thing as creating literature, and that the former therefore, requires a shift in an academic model where reflective practice generally ignores the unconscious aspects of the writing process.en_GB
dc.titleThe Butterfly Waltz, Female Identity And The Art of Reflectionen_GB
dc.typeThesisen_GB


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