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dc.contributor.authorManzotti, Riccardo
dc.contributor.authorPepperell, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-11T16:36:06Z
dc.date.available2013-01-11T16:36:06Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationManzotti, R. and Pepperell, R. (2013) 'The New Mind: thinking beyond the head', AI & society, 28(2), pp.157-166.
dc.identifier.issn1435-5655 (Online)
dc.identifier.issn0951-5666 (Print)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3711
dc.descriptionThis article was published in AI & Society on 15 February 2012 (Online), available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00146-012-0405-3en_GB
dc.description.abstractThroughout much of the modern period the human mind has been regarded as a property of the brain, and therefore something confined to the inside of the head — a view commonly known as 'internalism'. But recent works in cognitive science, philosophy, and anthropology, as well as certain trends in the development of technology, suggest an emerging view of the mind as a process not confined to the brain but spread through the body and world — an outlook covered by a family of views labeled 'externalism'. In this paper we will suggest there is now sufficient momentum in favour of externalism of various kinds to mark a historical shift in the way the mind is understood. We dub this emerging externalist tendency the 'New Mind'. Key properties of the New Mind will be summarized and some of its implications considered in areas such as art and culture, technology, and the science of consciousness.en_GB
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAI & Society
dc.subjectextended minden_GB
dc.subjectphilosophy of minden_GB
dc.titleThe New Mind: thinking beyond the headen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00146-012-0405-3


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