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dc.contributor.authorCarrick, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-31T13:27:13Z
dc.date.available2013-01-31T13:27:13Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3766
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this investigation is to assess the correlations between two Wingate anaerobic tests and 50-m freestyle swimming performance. The postures in question are as previous wingates have used a seated test compared to prone test. The reasoning for the investigation has been from looking at previous research from where all test looking at investigating the correlation of power against swimming times used a seated posture. From other research it has been noticed that small changes in posture create large changes in the available power output, suggesting that validity and reliability of dry land swimming tests can be improved by altering the posture at which the tests are conducted. Participants (n=12) volunteered from Cardiff Metropolitan University Swimming team, each completed the three protocols that were created, two dry land tests and a third pool based test. The pool test comprised of a 50-m freestyle sprint (without a dive) was conducted under standards as set by FINA the international swimming governing body, and swimming times taken. Each dry land protocol comprised of a 30-s upper body WAnT. The seated test followed the protocol as described by Franklin (1985), were as the prone test was performed by lying face down on a weight bench with arms extended forward onto the crank axel. Variables measured were peak power, mean power, fatigue index, time to peak cadence, peak cadence, relative peak power and mean power were also calculated. The findings of this investigation showed that there was a significant difference (p>0.01) between results produced in the prone and seated positions, in all variables other than fatigue index. Results did not however produce significant correlations between either dry land protocol to swimming times or velocity, however there was a distinct difference between each set of results with those in the prone position producing much higher correlations that those produced in the seated test. Results showed, peak power prone, mean power prone and peak cadence prone to have the strongest correlations, r=-0.315, r=-0.307,r=-0.559 respectively. These results support the hypothesis and although neither posture produced significant correlations to swimming performance it can be shown that swimming power can be better predicted by a prone WAnT, even considering there are many improvements that can be made from this investigation. Future implications may wish to investigate the difference in muscle activation between each posture which could help to understand differences between dry land training and pool training to further improve training regimes. This investigation has helped to build on previous research to improve the validity and reliability of improving swimming performance through dry land training. From the results we can see that there is a greater correlation between swimming times and a prone WAnT in comparison to the seated WAnT, this now in future should allow us to investigate further as to how these correlations occur.en_GB
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen_GB
dc.titleAN INVESTIGATION OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF POSTURAL VARIATION WITHIN WINGATE ANAEROBIC TEST IN RELATION TO SPRINT SWIMMING PERFORMANCEen_GB
dc.typeDissertation


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