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dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorGriffith, Chris J.
dc.contributor.authorSlader, J.
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, T.J.
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-17T11:25:40Z
dc.date.available2008-10-17T11:25:40Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationRedmond, E.C., Griffith, C.J., Slader, J. and Humphrey, T.J. (2004) 'Microbiological and observational analysis of cross contamination risks during domestic food preparation', British Food Journal, 106(8), pp.581-597.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-070X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/381
dc.descriptionThis article was published in British Food Journal in 2004, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00070700410553585
dc.description.abstractThe use of an observational approach in conjunction with isolation techniques for campylobacter and salmonella detection has facilitated a detailed evaluation of the risk of cross contamination during food preparation. Identification of suspected exposure routes has linked naturally contaminated raw foods with important food-handling malpractices, contaminated contact surfaces and ready-to-eat foods. In a model domestic kitchen, 29 per cent of food preparation sessions resulted in positive campylobacter isolations from prepared salads, cleaning materials and food-contact surfaces. Typing results showed that specific campylobacter strains isolated from prepared chicken salads were the same as the strains isolated from the raw chicken pieces, indicating microbial transfer during food preparation. Data obtained from this study can be used for exposure assessment, risk management and in the development of consumer risk communication strategies.en
dc.description.abstractThe use of an observational approach in conjunction with isolation techniques for campylobacter and salmonella detection has facilitated a detailed evaluation of the risk of cross contamination during food preparation. Identification of suspected exposure routes has linked naturally contaminated raw foods with important food‐handling malpractices, contaminated contact surfaces and ready‐to‐eat foods. In a model domestic kitchen, 29 per cent of food preparation sessions resulted in positive campylobacter isolations from prepared salads, cleaning materials and food‐contact surfaces. Typing results showed that specific campylobacter strains isolated from prepared chicken salads were the same as the strains isolated from the raw chicken pieces, indicating microbial transfer during food preparation. Data obtained from this study can be used for exposure assessment, risk management and in the development of consumer risk communication strategies
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBritish Food Journalen
dc.subjectfood safety
dc.subjectcontamination
dc.subjectrisk management
dc.titleMicrobiological and observational analysis of cross contamination risks during domestic food preparationen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00070700410553585en_US


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