Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorpeterson, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-11T12:57:11Z
dc.date.available2013-02-11T12:57:11Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3841
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to examine the lower extremity biomechanics of the stance phase of sprint and endurance athletes, performing maximum velocity sprint runs. The overall purpose of the study was to assist the development of coaching techniques used in the training of endurance and sprint athletes. Twelve specifically trained participants (six sprint & six endurance athletes) were recruited for the study. The participants were asked to run at maximum velocity over a 50m distance for three successful trials. A motion analysis system was used to track all kinematic data from anatomical landmarks identified on the body (MTP, heel, ankle, knee, hip and shoulder joint centres) to form an animated segmental linked system-stick image tracking each trial. A force plate was synchronised with the motion analysis system to obtain kinetic data from a single ground contact. Sprint athletes achieved an 18% increase in horizontal velocity compared to endurance athletes. Differences in stride (lengths, frequencies) and kinetic attributes (ground reaction forces, contact times and braking and propulsive characteristics) were evident throughout the stance phase. Significant r-squared relationships were found between contact time and maximum velocity (sprint & endurance); stride length and stride velocity (sprint & endurance); and stride frequency and stride velocity (endurance athletes only). The difference in the sprint athletes and endurance athletes was significantly due to the technique of the foot contact and partly the forces experienced during the landing. As distance runners attempt to sprint, the desired technical changes do not necessarily occur relative to trained sprinting technique. Biomechanical differences are evident in the technique and step characteristics of distance and sprint trained athletes. Both sprinters and distance runners may benefit from biomechanical interventions to improve technique or improve running speed and form near the end of a race. Customised training programmes may therefore be warranted to accommodate the diverse biomechanical responses of uniquely trained athletes.en_GB
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen_GB
dc.title"How do the lower extremity biomechanics of a sprint track athlete differ from an endurance athlete during the stance phase at high velocity running?"en_GB
dc.typeThesis


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record