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dc.contributor.authorRyan, Kelsie
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-11T13:21:13Z
dc.date.available2013-02-11T13:21:13Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3859
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of play that lead to all successful and unsuccessful shots at goal. A total of eighteen (n=18) games were analysed in four phases which considered the antecedents of all goal scoring opportunities: repossession phase, attacks made into the attacking 25, attacks into the D and the D where final outcomes occurred. In order to determine the location of these phases the pitch was divided into a 24 sectored matrix and operational definitions were identified for all performance variables. Time variables were presented for the time taken from repossession phases to the final outcome Results indicate that most repossession phases originated in the D (41%) by a penalty corner (40%) and interception (10%). Correspondingly; the further away quarter sectors are situated from this attacking D, the longer it took to engage in a shot. More successful (6%) and unsuccessful (34%) shots were initiated by right hand attacks into the attacking 25 which were mostly instigated by dribbling (49%). Entries into the D were mostly dribbled (p < 0.05) and were somewhat evenly distributed around the right and left hand sides (51% and 49% respectively). A significant relationship was found between the location of engaged shots and their outcome (p < 0.001). Unsuccessful (54%) and successful shots (52%) were mostly performed from the left hand side of the D, which were mostly executed by a hit (19%) or a reverse (20%) type shot. Most goals were scored by a flick, hit and a sweep (4% each) which also demonstrated a significant association (p < 0.01). More goals were scored in the bottom left of the goal (36%) and a ratio of 5:1 was established for the number of shots to goals. All results obtained and presented in this current study are beneficial to the coaching process of any coach working with elite teams. In the same context, antecedents which create successful shooting opportunities can be considered useful for coaches of all standard field hockey who desire success.en_GB
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen_GB
dc.titleA CHARACTERISTIC EVALUATION ON PATTERNS OF PLAY WITHIN WOMEN’S ELITE FIELD HOCKEY – WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO SUCCESSFUL AND UNSUCCESSFUL SHOTS ON GOALen_GB
dc.typeThesis


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