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dc.contributor.authorLewis, Joshua
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-01T11:53:49Z
dc.date.available2013-03-01T11:53:49Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3945
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the salience of sources of sport-confidence in non-elite invasion games players and identified any gender differences. Non-elite athletes (n=40) that competed in a range of sports, completed the Sources of Sports Confidence Questionnaires (SSCQ) (Vealey et al., 1998). Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients (1951) measured the internal reliability of the nine source based SSCQ subscales and resulted in all but one exceeding the acceptable alpha score. A one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted to generate multivariate and descriptive statistics that identified the significant differences between genders. Follow up independent t-tests were also conducted to indicate where the differences occurred. The main gender effects that emerged through the data analysis were significant differences between genders, with regard to demonstration of ability and physical self-preparation. The findings from both tests indicated that physical self-presentation was a more important source used by females to develop confidence than males. Demonstration of ability was reported by the male participants to be significantly more important source of sport-confidence to them than the females. Similarly to the findings of Hays et al.’s (2007) study, the current findings suggest that female invasion games players require quality preparation in order to feel confident about their sporting performance. However, male invasion games players need to be able to display their sporting prowess in order to enhance their sport-confidence. The current findings draw attention to the differences regarding sources of sport-confidence that depend upon gender. As a coach, the findings suggest that male athletes require preparation that allows them to demonstrate their ability. Whereas females need to feel that their physical self-presentation is adequate in order to feel confident. This indicates to a coach the importance of implementing appropriate interventions that allow these sources of confidence to be satisfied.en_GB
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen_GB
dc.titleTHE SOURCES OF SPORT-CONFIDENCE IN MALE AND FEMALE NON-ELITE INVASION GAMES PLAYERSen_GB
dc.typeDissertation


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