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dc.contributor.authorMckenzie, Allistair
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-01T12:06:39Z
dc.date.available2013-03-01T12:06:39Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/3955
dc.description.abstractThe development of sport and exercise science has lead to a large variety of resources available for athletes. Regardless of this, research has shown that nutritional practices adopted at all levels of performance adopt inadequate nutrient strategies. The purpose of the present study was to assess the adequacies of dietary intakes in developing (non elite) rugby union players in comparison to their ‘elite’ counterparts. Fifteen (elite, 8; non elite 7) males rugby union players with similar demographics (Age 24 ± 5.2 yrs, 19 ± 0.77 yrs; Height 1.78 ± 0.04 m, 1.79 ± 0.04 m, Weight 89 ± 3.0 Kg, 92.5 ± 2.4 Kg, BMI 29.16 ± 1.22 kg.m2, 28.6 ± 1.63 kg.m2) participated in the present study, each participant completed a three day food diary which processed using dietary analysis software (CompEat Pro 5.7) to quantify the macronutrient and micronutrient content of each diet. Statistical analysis was conducted comparing both elite and non elite subjects, as well as comparing each group to their estimated energy recommendation and requested nutrient intakes suggested by current governing bodies in sports nutrition. The results illustrated that there was a large level of variance between nutritional practices adopted by athletes. On average both the elite and non elite players consumed inadequate energy (P < 0.05) to match their estimated average recommendations (EAR) and requested nutrient intakes (RNI). This was due to a substantial deficiency in carbohydrate consumption (P < 0.01) and an excessive consumption of protein (P < 0.05). There is a considerable amount of research highlighting the importance of carbohydrate consumption and performance. It was recommended that the athletes in the present study that an increase in their carbohydrate intake would have dramatic benefits in weight maintenance and composition development, as well as delaying fatigue and promoting recovery. Although there were differences (P < 0.05) in fat and protein ingestion between non elite and elite, the discrepancies in comparison to the EAR and RNI showed to be a much relevant finding. It was concluded that assessment of nutritional knowledge and attitudes of coaches and players may be an area for future research as the findings would suggest a low level of understanding.en_GB
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiffen_GB
dc.titleAN ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY INTAKES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN ELITE AND NON ELITE RUGBY UNION PLAYERSen_GB
dc.typeThesis


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