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dc.contributor.authorMellick, Mikel
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-22T11:53:09Z
dc.date.available2013-04-22T11:53:09Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMellick, M. and Fleming, S. (2010) 'Personal narrative and the ethics of disclosure: A case study from elite sport', Qualitative Research, 10(3), pp.299-314en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-7941 (Print)
dc.identifier.issn1741-3109 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/4043
dc.description.abstractIn this article the ethics of disclosure through personal narrative are explored through a relatively benign autobiographical vignette concerning the background to a doctoral study on referee communication in rugby union football. It deals specifically with the referee’s encounters with three key 'actors': his mentor, a club coach, and a player (with a rich and therefore identifiable biography) who was 'sin binned' in a particular game. Through it, four substantive themes are explored: (i) the impracticality of voluntary informed consent; (ii) anonymity — and the possibilities for the errors of disclosed identities and mistaken identities; (iii) risk of harm; and (iv) violation of privacy.
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofseriesQualitative Research;
dc.subjectautobiography
dc.subjectconsent
dc.subjectdisclosure
dc.subjectethics
dc.titlePersonal narrative and the ethics of disclosure: A case study from elite sporten_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1468794110362873


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