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dc.contributor.authorBeauchamp, Gary
dc.contributor.authorParkinson, John
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-03T09:48:09Z
dc.date.available2013-05-03T09:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationBeauchamp, G. and Parkinson, J. (2008) Pupils’ attitudes towards school science as they transfer from an ICT-rich primary school to a secondary school with fewer ICT resources: Does ICT matter? Education and Information Technologies, 13 (2), pp.103 - 118.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1360-2357
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10639-007-9053-5
dc.description.abstractThe first part of this study was carried out in a primary school in a rural part of Wales in the United Kingdom. All classrooms were equipped with interactive whiteboards (IWBs) linked to a teacher’s computer and six PCs for pupil use. Teaching through ICT was the prevalent culture in the school. Thirty year six pupils [aged 10– 11 years] were selected at random from the final year cohort and were interviewed to determine their views about school science and their views about the teaching methods employed. The pupils moved to a medium sized secondary school where the teachers were beginning to develop their ICT skills and the availability of the computers was limited. The group was re-interviewed after 3 months, once they had settled in to their new school, and were again asked their views about school science and the way it was taught. While in the primary school, pupils expected to use ICT in every lesson, they enjoyed the way information was presented and they were interested in finding things out for themselves when given the opportunity. The lack of ICT in the secondary school caused some frustration, but this was mostly with the teaching of ICT, and the group remained predominantly enthusiastic about science. Those who were less keen on science indicated that it was a teacher factor rather than anything to do with the resources being used. In general the pupils particularly enjoyed the practical aspects of science lessons, something that they had not experienced in the primary school, which compensated for the relative lack of ICT in science teaching.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherSpringer USen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEducation and Information Technologies;
dc.subjectInformation and Communication Technologyen_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.subjectICT
dc.titlePupils’ attitudes towards school science as they transfer from an ICT-rich primary school to a secondary school with fewer ICT resources: Does ICT matter?en_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10639-007-9053-5


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