Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJones, Eleri
dc.contributor.authorDobson, John
dc.contributor.authorBotterill, David
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-17T11:27:34Z
dc.date.available2008-10-17T11:27:34Z
dc.date.issued2005-12-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationInterdisciplinary Environmental Review, 7 (2), pp.1-12en_US
dc.identifier.issn0023-6234
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/431
dc.description.abstractWildlife tourism is increasingly utilising vulnerable and endangered species as tourist attractions. This paper uses the South African cage diving industry as a case study to assess the contributions that the tourism industry can make to the conservation of the Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias). The study highlights that individual operators can make positive contributions using various mechanisms such as interpretation, education and contributing towards scientific research. However when the industry is examined as a collective whole then a number of paradoxes and complications emerge. The study demonstrates that operators face immense pressure when trying to reconcile conservation objectives with business profitability and client satisfaction. This can lead to the development of inappropriate business practices that are counter–productive to the overall aims of conserving target species such as the Great White Shark.
dc.publisherInterdisciplinary Environmental Associationen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInterdisciplinary Environmental Reviewen
dc.titleExploitation or Conservation: Can Wildlife Tourism Help Conserve Vulnerable and Endangered Species?en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1504/IER.2005.053939


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record