Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Charlotte
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-10T08:32:49Z
dc.date.available2013-10-10T08:32:49Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/4746
dc.descriptionSport & Physical Education BSc (Hons)en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is a growing awareness of the complex, and mostly negative attitudes and views many adolescent girls express and hold regarding Physical Activity (PA) and Physical Education (PE) in particular. This case study focused solely on adolescent girls’ understandings, experiences, and motivations of PA and PE. The literature alludes to a wide range of understandings which are underpinned in this study, in an attempt to comprehend and construe girls’ insights, as well as the connections between the body, gender ideologies and social relationships and networks within a PE and PA context. The study consisted of questionnaires (n=87) and semi-structured focus group interviews (n=10) with female high school students aged 12-15 (M = 13.5; SD = 2.1). Varied sub-cultures and identity, issues within gender, hegemonic masculinity and emphasised femininity were drawn upon to enhance familiarity and make sense of the girls’ narratives. The study drew upon previous findings revealing gender as a prominent barrier, where polarised images of adolescent girls taking part in PE or PA are non-congruous amongst the traditional roots, and embedded ideologies of acceptable femininity. These contradictions appeared to force the female students into uncomfortable situations and required them to make complex decisions regarding their sense of self-identity, which signified a theme of tension in attempt to cope with the paradoxes faced. Furthermore, it was found that girl-only PE settings also raised problematic concern, where routinely in order to reinforce social status and marginalise others; lessons were ‘used’ to include and exclude. This study’s findings have replicated many ideological perspectives previously encountered by researchers. The development of PE curricula and structure to gain and uphold the interest of females is eminent and valuable, in providing a prosaic basis, rationale, and recommendations for educators to work from, embedded within the structure and organisation of the subject to tackle this conundrum.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleAdolescent girls’ perceptions of physical activity and physical education: a case study investigation of the factors impacting on year 8 and 10 girls’ engagement and participation in physical activity and physical educationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record