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dc.contributor.authorShort, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-17T15:57:57Z
dc.date.available2013-10-17T15:57:57Z
dc.date.issued2012-06
dc.identifier.citationShort.C, 'The role of mathematical structure, natural form and pattern in the art theory of Wassily Kandinsky: the quest for order and unity' in Meanings of Abstract Art: Between Nature and Theory, ed. Paul Crowther & Isabel Wunsche, Routledge, 2012, pp 64-80en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-415-89993-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/4793
dc.description.abstractThis paper will attend to the use of mathematical structure, natural form and pattern in the writings of Wassily Kandinsky, focussing in particular on the 'Point and Line to Plane' (1926), but also exploring earlier number and geometrical forms (what we might call mathematical patterns), and in a combination of geometric, graphic and natural forms arranged in sequences (more general morphological patterns). The paper will consider first, Kandinsky’s references to mathematic, geometry, and abstract patterns of perception; then, it will consider patterns that Kandinsky discovers in nature and in art. In each of these talks, it will begin to uncover Kandinsky’s theory of evolution. Kandinsky’s purpose in using such structure is to establish coherent principles of construction within abstract art, and to seek out and fully realise what he called 'synthesis' in art and life.en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.subjectFine Art Researchen_US
dc.subjectWassily Kandinskyen_US
dc.subjectSynthesisen_US
dc.subjectMathematical Structureen_US
dc.subjectPatternen_US
dc.subjectGeometryen_US
dc.titleThe role of mathematical structure, natural form and pattern in the art theory of Wassily Kandinsky: the quest for order and unityen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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