Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSilk, Victoria
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-29T14:35:10Z
dc.date.available2013-10-29T14:35:10Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/4904
dc.description.abstractVealey and Chase’s (2008) conceptualisation of sport confidence recognised that athlete characteristics and organisational culture affect the manifestation of sport confidence within athletes’. The framework also indicated several factors (e.g., physical skills, characteristics of the athlete and external uncontrollable factors) may lead to debilitate a performers’ sport confidence. To date previous research into confidence debilitating factors in sport has been limited to the secondary purpose within Hays et al.’s (2009) research. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to expand the current literature on confidence debilitating factors within the different organisational culture of disability sport. Pre-interview booklets and semi-structured interviews identified the types, sources and confidence debilitating factors in 16 disabled athletes (8 elite and 8 non-elite). Qualitative data was analysed inductively and revealed n o significant differences between the elite and non-elite level athletes, so the findings were combined. Six types of sport confidence were identified from the analysis, including: achievement, skill execution, physical factors, psychological factors, superiority to opposition and athlete specific factors. These beliefs were gained from seven sources of sport confidence: preparation, performance accomplishments, coaching, experience, social support, competitive advantage and athlete specific factors. The athletes identified six confidence debilitating factors, including: poor preparation, injury/illness, poor performance, pressure and expectation, psychological factors and athlete specific factors. The findings revealed similarities with previous research on self-efficacy (cf. Bandura, 1977) and the sources of sport confidence (cf. Hays et al., 2007) as well as providing support for the confidence debilitating factors previously identified in Hays et al.’s (2009) study Although, this study identified differences from previous research with regards to gender and the number of citing’s for the types, sources and confidence debilitating factors. Overall, this study supports the notion within Vealey and Chases’ (2008) model; that organisational factors influence athletes’ sport confidence. Practical implications of the current findings can provide practitioners, working with disabled athletes’ and coaches’, insights to help athletes’ recognise what debilitates their sport-confidence. Consequently, interventions developed to protect athletes’ sport-confidence should be targeted towards increasing an athletes’ range of confidence types and sources and recognising their current types and sources of confidence prior to a competition in order to develop robust sport-confidence.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titlePERCEPTIONS OF THE DEBILITATING FACTORS OF SPORT-CONFIDENCE IN DISABLED ATHLETESen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record