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dc.contributor.authorGoldman, Alex
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-30T13:47:37Z
dc.date.available2013-10-30T13:47:37Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/4926
dc.description.abstractIn recent years there has been an increase in the number of studies conducted examining coach behaviours, in a variety of sports at an elite level, through the use of systematic observations (Guzmán & Goméz, 2012). Zetou, Ampraisie, Michalopoulou and Aggelousis (2011) explain that it is an important area of coaching science, as coach behaviours can affect the interactions between coach and athlete; although it almost impossible as a coach, to be able to identify and behave in a way in which all athletes will be satisfied. Few existing studies have accounted for the athletes perceptions of the coach behaviours and furthermore, gained an insight as to how the coach behaviours effect the interactions between coach and athlete. The aim of this study sought to extend the existing coach behaviour literature, and to provide an insight of the coach behaviours demonstrated at a semi-elite / developmental cricket club. The Arizona State University Observation Instrument (A.S.U.O.I) was utilized to gather data of one coach from four training sessions (Lacy & Darst, 1989). Drawing upon the results of the A.S.U.O.I, semi-structured interview guides were developed. The head coach and six athletes were interviewed to gain further information regarding the observed coach behaviours. The interviews were transcribed and interpreted; key themes were then drawn from the transcription and used to identify the coach behaviours demonstrated at a semi-elite level, the coach-athlete interactions and the power relationship between coach and athlete. The results of the A.S.U.O.I were found to be in accordance with existing literature of coach behaviours examined at an elite level. Categories regarding instruction, praise and silence were found to be the most frequent coach behaviours observed (Potrac et al., 2002; Potrac et al, 2007). The interviews however, provided some discrepancy between the coach and the athletes’ perspectives for the use of the coach behaviours at a semi-elite level of cricket. Key Words: Coach Behaviour, Instruction, Feedback, Praise, Interactions.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleAn Examination of the Coaching Behaviours of a Semi-Elite /en_US


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