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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-03T11:47:22Z
dc.date.available2014-04-03T11:47:22Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/5516
dc.descriptionBA (Hons) Tourism Managementen_US
dc.description.abstractAn investigation and analysis was made of how two British seaside resorts – Barry and Weston-Super-Mare are implementing regeneration strategies to attract tourists back to their resorts. The two British seaside resorts that were chosen are different from each other as they both appeal to different tourists. Barry attracts mainly day visitors with the majority of those being 'working class' to the destination offering many amusements and a theme park for a fun day out, Weston however, offer amenities such as big hotels located on the seafront to attract overnight visitors mainly from 'middle class' with attractions like museums, cinema, shops and much more. Literature was composed of secondary research about how popular British seaside resorts were in the early 90s as they were visited by many tourists throughout the United Kingdom; how and why they went into decline over the years using the two case studies as examples and what they are doing to rejuvenate themselves and encourage tourists back to the destination. Following the literature a research method was decided for collecting primary research. It was decided that using the qualitative method the student would interview council members from each case study destination. Relevant interview questions relating to tourism at each destination were drawn up whilst taking into account the aim and objectives of the dissertation. The student found that this research method was more relevant than the quantitative method as the student wanted to find descriptive data about the destinations and what they are doing to attract tourists to the destinations. After conducting both interviews at each destination interesting findings were concluded. Both destinations explained their current situation regarding how attractive and popular they are to tourists. After realising their destination is in need of revamping to attract tourists back to the area, they are implementing regeneration strategies to improve the destination for tourists to visit whether for a day or to stay overnight. It has been easy to see many British seaside resorts have gone into decline mainly because of overseas competition and the only way to rejuvenate themselves is to implement regeneration strategies as it seems more effective to have several strategies that can help improve the destination and attract different types of tourists; as the needs and wants of tourists continually change when looking for a holiday so, if British seaside resorts implement regeneration strategies that appeal to a wide range of tourists needs' and wants' they can become more popular as a tourist destination.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan University
dc.subjecttourism managementen_US
dc.titleBritish seaside regeneration: two case studiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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