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dc.contributor.authorWadey, Ross
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Lynne
dc.contributor.authorHanton, Sheldon
dc.contributor.authorNeil, Rich
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-01T11:41:48Z
dc.date.available2014-05-01T11:41:48Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationWadey, R., Evans, L., Hanton, S. and Neil, R. (2012) 'An examination of hardiness throughout the sport‐injury process: A qualitative follow‐up study', British journal of Health Psychology, 17(4), pp.872-893.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359-107X (print)
dc.identifier.issn2044-8287 (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8287.2012.02084.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/5669
dc.descriptionThis article was published in British Journal of Health Psychology on 9 August 2012 (online), available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8287.2012.02084.x
dc.description.abstractObjectives. This qualitative follow-up study aimed to enhance the interpretability and meaningfulness of the findings that emerged from a quantitative study that explored the effect of hardiness on the prediction of, and response to, sport injury (i.e., Wadey, Evans, Hanton, & Neil, 2012). Design. Using theory-based and maximum-variation sampling to contextualize and provide an in-depth understanding of the previous findings, the participants comprised a purposeful sample of 10 athletes from the quantitative study (M age = 21.7; SD= 1.06). Methods. Data were derived through semi-structured interviews, and analysed and displayed using composite sequence analysis (Miles & Huberman, 1994). Results. The findings extended Wadey et al.'s (2012) study by identifying the perceived mechanisms by which athletes high and low in hardiness exacerbated or attenuated the impact of pre-injury negative major life events (i.e., a significant predictor of sport injury) and post-injury responses. Specifically, the findings demonstrate that athletes high in hardiness possessed a refined repertoire of problem- and emotion-focused coping strategies that they used pre- and post-injury. Those athletes low in hardiness used avoidance coping strategies that had long-term negative implications. Conclusions. These findings have important implications for the structure, timing, and content of hardiness interventions that aim to reduce rates of injury occurrence and expedite injured athletes’ return to competitive sport.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBritish Journal of Health Psychology
dc.titleAn examination of hardiness throughout the sport-injury process: A qualitative follow-up studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8287.2012.02084.x


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