Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPatel, Matthy
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-14T12:08:39Z
dc.date.available2014-08-14T12:08:39Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/5936
dc.descriptionDEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) SPORT COACHINGen_US
dc.description.abstractDuring a javelin throw, research suggests that 70% of the release speed is provided during the point of foot contact with the ground at the start of the block and the point of release, yet this only lasts one tenth of a second. This study was designed to analyse this short period of time; more specifically, whether the rate of force development exerted into the ground during the block directly linked to speed of release? Three elite throwers were used as participants and were studied over six trials each. CODA motion analysis system (200 Hz), a force plate (1000 Hz) and a video camera (50 Hz) were used to conduct a 3D analyses of the participants’ block. No definitive correlation was found between rate of force development and the speed of release (correlations of 0.39, -0.48 and 0.44 for participants one, two and three respectively) however after including other factors a strong relationship was found between the two variables. To enhance speed of release the amount of time the force is applied on the object and the magnitude of this force needs to be optimised. An effective block increased the time between the point of foot contact and release (the time the force was acting on the object), as well as increased the magnitude of the force by increasing the separation angles between joints, thus increasing the torque; however movements became slow (reducing the force) if the time continued to increase. An effective block also aided momentum transfer into the hip strike, further increasing the magnitude of the force. The findings suggested that an effective block is vital in optimising the speed of release. This entails achieving the highest rate of force development possible during the block (found to be highly dependent on an individual’s optimal run up speed)en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleHow the rate of force development at the start of the block affects theen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record