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dc.contributor.authorTurrell, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T09:37:02Z
dc.date.available2014-08-15T09:37:02Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6029
dc.descriptionDEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATIONen_US
dc.description.abstractJing and Ha (2012) performed a review of physical education inclusion literature from the past 20 years. Although they believed many studies have been beneficial to the research area they argued that, a potential limitation within the literature was the lack of stakeholder (e.g., parents or teachers) perspective research from different social and cultural perspectives. The present study conducted one on one interviews with five different special needs school teachers. This enabled the researcher to examine inclusion from a different social experience of PE from within special needs schools. Aims: the aims of the present study, firstly, were to question participant’s beliefs regarding the importance of including children with special educational needs in physical education, and question what they believe the benefits are for them taking part. This aimed to assess whether the benefits of PE may differ for special needs children when compared to mainstream students. Secondly, the research aimed to find, what teaching styles and strategies those teachers believe enabled them to allow their students to participate in PE. This research aimed to provide a resource that potential special needs school teachers could use to find practical examples of the teaching strategies used by qualified, experienced teachers. Results: results indicated that there are many benefits for special needs children taking part in PE, these included, enjoyment, development of gross and fine motor skills, communication skills and more. Other results found that there may be benefits of PE that may not be considered in a main stream school environment such as, physio therapy. Other results illustrated, that when considering teaching styles and strategies, there is a need for special needs teachers to really consider the teaching styles they use when working in different classes, as different students with different needs may respond/benefit more from different teaching styles. Conclusion: Consequently, findings support Armstrong’s (2005) suggestion that, inclusion for pupils with special educational needs should be recognised as a process that is responsive and flexible to pupil needs, and furthermore should move beyond traditional concepts of integration into mainstream PE methods.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleSpecial needs school teacher’s beliefs about inclusion and what teaching styles and strategies best facilitate the inclusion of children with special educational needs in PE lessons?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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