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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Sian
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T10:37:45Z
dc.date.available2014-08-15T10:37:45Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6064
dc.descriptionDEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) SPORT & PHYSICAL EDUCATIONen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the effect starting at university had on students’ reported alcohol consumption and drinking motives, as university students are thought to commonly adopt a lifestyle which encourages excessive alcohol drinking habits. The aim of this study was to discover if first year university students experienced a change in alcohol consumption and drinking motives after joining university. Secondly to further understand the influences sport participation and peer influences have on alcohol consumption and drinking motives. The sample (n= 76) were first year students in a South East Wales university. The study applied a quantitative research design, which utilised an amalgamation of demographic questions as well as two validated measures; the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) (Saunders et al., 1993) and the Drinking Motives Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R) (Cooper,1994). A repeated measure ANOVA was performed on the whole group, between gender and between sport and non-sport participants on each subscale prior to and during university. A probability of 95% significance (p<0.05) was used. Findings identified a significant difference (p<0.05) amongst all AUDIT subscales and total score among the whole group prior to, and during university. The study also identified a significant difference in all drinking motives subscales and total score apart from the coping motive score where no significant difference (p>0.05) was found. The only significant difference which occurred among gender was that males had significantly higher dependence scores to females and also increased their dependence scores during university. (Males = Prior, 1.70 ±1.90, During 2.88 ±2.71), (Females = Prior 1.47 ±2.05, During 1.67 ±2.07). No significant differences (p>0.05) occurred between sport and non-sport participants for any subscales or total score prior to or during university. In conclusion, it was observed that university had an effect on alcohol consumption and drinking motives during university. However, dependence increased among males, and sport and non-sport participation didn’t enhance any significant differences. In conclusion, the first hypothesis was accepted while the other two were rejected.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleReported changes in alcohol consumption and drinking motivations of 1st year undergraduates from a South East Wales Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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