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dc.contributor.authorMainwaring, Kyle
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T11:55:05Z
dc.date.available2014-08-15T11:55:05Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6113
dc.descriptionDEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) SPORT AND EXERCISE SCIENCEen_US
dc.description.abstractWithin modern day sports, a great amount of emphasis is being placed on potential methods of improving performance. One potential method within performance is time motion analysis. One possible method used for conducting time motion analysis is the use of GPS. In comparison to other field-based sports, very little amounts of research is available which used GPS as a method of quantifying movement patterns in football. Considering this, the current study drew upon GPS as a method of collecting data concerned with distances covered, maximum velocities, distances covered within specific velocity bands, player load and exertion index. Eight home matches of Cardiff Metropolitan University second XI were analysed over a three-month period in order to create a sufficient data set. Data was then transferred into Microsoft excel where averages and standard deviations were calculated before being exported into SPSS for quartile norms tests to be conducted. Three players (centre back, centre midfield and centre attacking midfield) average data was then compared to the median values extracted from the quartile norms test. When the averages and standard deviations were calculated for each playing position, the data suggested that centre midfield player number four produced the highest figures when examining data concerned with distances covered, player load and exertion index. In contrast to the central midfield player, the data also suggests that over the period of eight games, the right wing was producing the lowest statistics. When comparing the data of the centre back, centre midfield and centre attacking midfield players to the median values, It was illustrated that the centre midfield player elicited figures above the median values for seven out of nine variables, whereas in comparison the centre back and centre attacking midfield players produced figures above the median in three out of nine variables and two out of nine variables respectively. In conclusion to these findings, central midfielders were found to be working at the highest rate.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Work rates in Collegiate Level Association Footballen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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