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dc.contributor.authorKneebone, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T12:12:51Z
dc.date.available2014-08-15T12:12:51Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6126
dc.descriptionDEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS) DANCEen_US
dc.description.abstractThis research aimed to identify whether a stereotype of male contemporary dancers exists within popular culture and televised media. It then addressed how this impacts upon male participation and entrance into contemporary dance. The study developed knowledge around the lack of participation and provided suggestions on how this could be improved. This study followed a mixed qualitative and quantitative research design, including a media analysis, survey and two interviews. The media analysis looked at three clips of male contemporary dancers within popular television in the past three years, to identify and establish the presented stereotype. The survey, formed through identifying key themes in existing literature relating to the research question, was completed online by 12 male participants. Two interviews were conducted, one with two male final year sport students and one male final year dance student; these were also formatted using the key themes identified and incorporated the video clips used within the media analysed as a point of discussion. The findings were then compared to identify the stereotype that exists and the impact that this has on male participation in dance. The stereotype identified presented a feminine view of male contemporary dancers, which seemed to be problematic for both dancers and non-dancers. Essentially males who do not dance do not want to start and males that do dance feel that there is not a fair representation of male contemporary dancers within British culture because of this stereotype. The research underpins ways in which future research and practice could alter these stereotypes and change the way male contemporary dancers are presented in the media, resulting in an more positive image to encourage male participation in danceen_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleIs there a Stereotype of Male Contemporary Dancers presented in British Popular Culture with Particular Reference to Current Televised Media, and how does this Impact on Male Participation in Contemporary Dance?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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