Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorODUTOLA, OLUWATOMIWA
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-27T15:24:31Z
dc.date.available2015-01-27T15:24:31Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6582
dc.descriptionBSc Hons ECONOMICSen_US
dc.description.abstractAbstract As a result of volatile oil prices coupled with the intensified anxiety with regards to global warming, the proposal of an effectively administrated electrical vehicle network has come to be progressively more appealing. The purpose of this investigation is to establish the primary limitations to the adoption of electrical vehicles in the UK. This will be achieved by virtue of the analysis of three potential restrictions: the charging infrastructure, apprehension with regards to the available range of electrical vehicles and concerns in relation to the battery technology. This study makes use of a modified variant of Bilotkach and Mills’ model (2012), exploring the contrasting utilities of Electrical vehicle ownership compared with that of an internal combustion engine vehicle. The model was adapted in order to integrate the prospective progressions, within the electrical vehicle industry, in both battery technology and charging infrastructure. Furthermore, statistical data derived from the Department for Transport was also incorporated within the model, providing us with an understanding of the future prospects of the Electrical vehicle industry in the UK. The results attained from the study proposed three plausible resolutions to the lack of electrical vehicle ownership within the UK. The solutions included developing the current range of electrical vehicles, enhancing the charging infrastructure or lowering the relative purchase price of electrical vehicles. The fall that would be deemed plausible, in the relative purchase price is characterised by a 10.8% rise in fuel prices for internal combustion engines, or a 3.6% fall in the cost of purchasing an electrical vehicle. The study proposes that in the short term the best way to improve the level of electrical vehicle ownership is to increase the range, putting emphasis on the significance of ‘Range Anxiety’ in restricting the adoption of electrical vehicles. On the other hand, the study also suggests that in the long run the solution to electrical vehicle adoption exists in an effectively and efficiently installed charging infrastructure exceeding substantial advancements in range.en_US
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.subjectAn investigation into the principle limitating factors to electric vehicle adoption in the UKen_US
dc.titleAn investigation into the principle limitating factors to electric vehicle adoption in the UKen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record