Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCinquegrani, Chelsea
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-11T09:48:48Z
dc.date.available2015-06-11T09:48:48Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6825
dc.description.abstractDonnelly and Young (1988) suggest that membership in certain subcultures requires individuals to enact an appropriate identity; transitioning to university thrusts individuals into conditions of social change, which may require them to negotiate their identity for acceptance within a new cultural setting. This study’s intention, through narrative inquiry, explored four female dancers’ lived experiences of pursuing a sport degree and moving to university. A comparison of dance and sport culture sheds light on the cultural and structural limits of narratives in the process of identity reconstruction. Employing a narrative structural and thematic analysis, this research considered the certain narratives and stories culture makes available for individuals. Using a focus group and one-to-one interviews to generate biographical accounts (Riessman, 1993), this study explored the significance dance played and still plays in their embodied experience and ability to narrate ‘self’ in a new context. This study illuminates how the dancers’ experiences failed to match the story they had been cast into, as a consequence of the culturally opposing limits of dance versus sport. Additionally, the study also found that narrative resources can expand opening spaces for individuals to reconstruct their identity.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleNarrating Identity as a Dancer in a Sport Education Context.en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record