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dc.contributor.authorShields, Callum
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-19T14:21:16Z
dc.date.available2015-06-19T14:21:16Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10369/6910
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of assisted and resisted plyometric exercises as potentiating exercises for vertical jump performance (VJP). Method: 11 male university level trained basketball players (Mean Age 21 ± 2 years, Height 182.2 ± 8 cm, Weight 78.8 ± 9.9 kg) completed a standardised warm up before preforming four repetitions of either a body weight control, resisted or assisted countermovement jumps (CMJ), eight minutes before re-testing. Only one intervention was carried out each day and the participants had to rest 24 hours before undertaking another intervention. The tension of each resistance band was set at 30% of the participant’s bodyweight. Rate of force development (RFD), peak force (PF) and vertical jump height (VJH) were recorded during the testing procedure and compared against the participant’s previous baseline data. Results: The One-Way Repeated Measures ANOVA’s identified no significant difference (P > 0.05) in RFD, PF or VJH between the control and assisted, control and resisted or assisted and resisted interventions. Individual analysis identified six out of 11 participants generated an increase in VJH during the resisted intervention and five experienced an increased during the assisted intervention. Seven participants produced an increase in RFD during the resisted intervention, while six improved during the assisted jump. Only four participants improved PF during resisted jumping, while only three participants experienced improvements during assisted. Conclusion: The present study concludes that at tensions of 30% of bodyweight, there are no potentiating effects generated from assisted or resisted banded jumping. The individualisation of post activation potentiation (PAP) is highlighted by the present studies results and supports previous current literature covering this topic. Although the present study identified no statistical significance within the group, strength and conditioning coaches are drawn to the positive individual responses to PAP that support current research and its practical applications.en_US
dc.formatThesisen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherCardiff Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.titleTHE ACUTE EFFECTS OF ASSISTED AND RESISTED THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF ASSISTED AND RESISTEDen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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